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Wings Over Kansas Col. George M. Boyd, CAP, “Remembers the Tuskegee Airmen!” – Wings Over Kansas

Dr. Donald E. Jackson: History Maker!

December 7, 2009 0

During World War II, the U.S. military was racially segregated. Reflecting American society and law at the time, most black soldiers and sailors were restricted to labor battalions and other support positions. […]

Tuskegee Airmen Soared to New Heights

March 8, 2009 0

The 99th Fighter Squadron went to North Africa in April and flew its first combat mission against the island of Pantelleria on June 2, 1943. On June 9th, a flight, led by Lt. Charles Dryden was attacked by enemy aircraft. Lieutenants (Lt.) Willie Ashley, Sidney P. Brooks, Lee Rayford, Leon Roberts, and Spann Watson engaged the German fighter planes. […]

Tuskegee Airmen

February 8, 2009 0

The Tuskegee Airmen is the popular name of a group of African American pilots who flew with distinction during World War II as the 332nd Fighter Group of the US Army Air Corps. […]

TUSKEGEE AIRMEN

December 14, 2008 0

During World War II, the U.S. military was racially segregated. Reflecting American society and law at the time, most black soldiers and sailors were restricted to labor battalions and other support positions. […]

TUSKEGEE AIRMEN

March 10, 2008 0

George Mills Boyd, Former Tuskegee Airman, Commander, Kansas Wing of the Civil Air Patrol […]

Benjamin Davis, American

March 9, 2008 0

Barred initially from flight training because of color, the leader of the Tuskegee Airmen became a major force for full integration in the Air Force. […]

Tuskegee Airmen

March 8, 2008 0

The Tuskegee Airmen was the popular name of a group of African American pilots who flew with distinction for the United States Army Air Corps during World War II. […]

The Tuskegee Airmen

March 7, 2008 0

In the 1930s, the U.S. military was a racially segregated institution, reflecting the legal and defacto segregation in much of the United States. […]

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